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Sunlight should not be confused with daylight. Sunlight is the light of the sun only. Daylight is a combination of sunlight and skylight. These values are approximate since many factors affect the Correlated Color Temperature. For consistency, 5500K is considered to be Nominal Photographic Daylight. The difference between 5000K and 6000K is only 33 Mireds, the same photographic or visual difference as that between household tugsten lights and 3200K photo lamps (the approximate equivalent of 'A Blue or Vs Orange lighting filters).

Sunlight should not be confused with daylight. Sunlight is the light of the sun only. Daylight is a combination of sunlight and skylight. These values are approximate since many factors affect the Correlated Color Temperature. For consistency, 5500K is considered to be Nominal Photographic Daylight. The difference between 5000K and 6000K is only 33 Mireds, the same photographic or visual difference as that between household tugsten lights and 3200K photo lamps (the approximate equivalent of 'A Blue or Vs Orange lighting filters).

The MIRED System

When dealing with sunlight and incandescent sources (both standard and tungsten halogen types), the MIRED system offers a convenient means for dealing with the problems of measurement when adjusting from one color tem perature to another. This system is only for sources that can truly be described as having a color temperature. The term MIRED is an acronym for Micro Reciprocal Degrees. The MIRED number for a given color temperature is determined by using the following relationship: 1,000,000

MIRED Value =-

Color Temperature (degrees Kelvin)

As a convenience, refer to page 323, which is a quick reference for determining the MIRED values for color temperatures between 2000K and 6900K in 100-degree steps.

Filters which change the effective color temperature of a source by a definite amount can be characterized by a "MIRED shift value." This value is computed as follows:

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