Introduction

The Films of Federico Fellini provides an introductory overview of the Italian director's life and work, with particular focus upon five important films La strada, La dolce vita, 8I 2, Amarcord, and Intervista. The first four works were incredibly successful, both critically and commercially, winning numerous awards and establishing Fellini's international reputation as Italy's most important film director. The last work, Fellini's penultimate film, provides a summary of Fellini's cinematic...

The Move to Rome and Fellinis Precinematic Career as a Writer

In 1939, the young Fellini moved to Rome with his mother and sister. In Rome, he enrolled in the Faculty of Law at the university but never completed a degree. Soon, the friends Fellini met would play a determinative role in the choice of his eventual career as cartoonist, journalist, gagman, and scriptwriter. Fellini began to work on Marc'Aurelio, a widely distributed and highly influential biweekly humor magazine filled with gags, cartoons, and brief comic sketches. Between 1939 and the end...

Life in Cinema

When Federico Fellini died on 31 October 1993, he had reached the pinnacle of international success. In April of that year, the American Academy of Motion Pictures and Sciences had honored him with a lifetime achievement, an Honorary Award for his entire career. This was his fifth Oscar, after earlier awards in the category of Best Foreign Film for La strada 1954 , Le nottidi Cabiria The Nights of Cabiria, 1957 , 8i 2 1963 , and Amarcord 1973 , not to mention numerous nominations and awards in...

The Cinema of Poetry and the Road beyond Neorealism

The Road Federico Fellini

With the astounding international success of Roma, citta aperta Open City, 1945 by Roberto Rossellini 1906-77 , war-weary Europe and America encountered what was considered to be a new cinematic aesthetic, Italian neorealism. In a very brief space of time no more than a decade , a number of relatively inexpensive films were exported from Italy and were greeted abroad although not always within Italy itself with great critical acclaim. Besides the work of Rossellini especially Roma, citta aperta...

The Mature Auteur La dolce vita and a New Subjective Film Narrative

Satyricon Fellini Banquet Scene

With the unprecedented international success of La dolce vita, Fellini departed in a number of fundamental ways from the aesthetic and thematic preoccupations that had earned him the coveted title of auteur from international critics. Whereas his cinema first emerged in his trilogy of character from a dialectical relationship with neorealist cinema, a style of filmmaking in which Fellini's career began as a scriptwriter, the evolution of Fellini's film language in La dolce vita and afterward -...

From Neorealist Scriptwriting to Direction The Trilogy of Character in Luci del varieta Lo sceicco bianco and I

While continuing to write scripts for Lux Film, Fellini's debut as a director came about as the result of a collaborative effort with one of Lux's more experienced directors, Alberto Lattuada. The film starring his own wife, Giulietta Masina, as well as Lattuada's wife, Carla Del Poggio was entitled Luci del varieta Variety Lights, 1950 . The film was not a success ranking sixty-fifth in gross ticket sales in the 1950-1 season and even failed to garner the usual government subsidy given to...

International Fame on the Road beyond Neorealism La strada Il bidone and Le notti di Cabiria

If Fellini's trilogy of character retained a neorealist flavor in what critics today now praise as the accurate and believable if comic portrait of the Italian provinces in the 1950s, Fellini's subsequent trilogy of grace or salvation moved immediately beyond the ideological boundaries of neorealist cinema defined as socially relevant cinema and toward a philosophical position of Christian existentialism that exploited traditional iconography or religious concepts such as that of conversion to...

Early Days in Rimini and the Romagna

Nothing in Fellini's early life or background would lead the casual observer to predict the heights to which his fame would reach. His parents, Ida Barbiani a housewife and Urbano Fellini a traveling salesman were of no great distinction in terms of wealth or birth. Fellini was part of a relatively small family by Italian standards of the period a younger brother Riccardo was born in 1921, followed by his sister Maddalena in 1929. Fellini himself was born on 20 January 1920 in Rimini, a small...