Pamgrier Foxy Brown

Foxy's in town, so gather 'round and watch a real shake down. 'Cause she's got drive and that ain't jive. She don't bother to bring 'em back alive!

Foxy Brown (1974)

Courtesy of the Tony Nourmand Collection

Barbarella <1968)

Art by Robin Ray

Courtesy of The Reel Poster Gallery

Barbarella <1968)

Art by Robin Ray

Courtesy of The Reel Poster Gallery

Barbarella was classic exploitation but on a bigger budget. The themes of space travel and societies of the future were just an excuse to indulge in plentiful nudity and sex in the fun-filled 60s. The British poster campaign reflects the sexual revolution that was a major feature of the decade. Indeed, the designer of the British artwork, Robin Ray, won the title of Erotic Artist of the Year in 2001. That said, it is interesting to compare Ray's artwork with the finished poster, where all nudity and explicit innuendo were eliminated to satisfy the not-so-fun-filled British Board of Film Censorship.

The 'King of the Czech Comics', Kaja Saudek (b. 1935), who was renowned for his brilliant work in the field of adult comic books, was an obvious choice as artist for the Czechoslovakian poster. One of Saudek's most famous creations is a science-fiction epic featuring a winged beauty, Muriel, which was very obviously influenced by the original creator of Barbarella, Jean Claude Forest. Incidentally, Saudek modelled Muriel on Bridget Bardot, one-time wife of Barbarella director Rodger Vadim.

Barbarella (1968)

Original Artwork. Mixed media on board. Signed middle left. Art by Robin Ray

Courtesy of the Haldane Collection

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Film Art Posters

Barbarella (1968)

Czechoslovakiari 33 x 23 in. <84 x 58 cm) Art by Kaja Saudek

Courtesy of the Mo Sheikh-Kadir Collection

In the 50s it was not just the traditional exploitation industry that could see the business potential of the new teenage market that had been borne out of the unprecedented wealth of post-war America. | In the mid-50s, Samuel Z. Arkoff <1918-2001) and James H. Nicholson (1916-1972) formed American International Pictures and began churning out 'B' movies that were a massive success on the drive-in circuit. They focused on teen interest films and most plots centred on juvenile delinquency, science fiction or horror. The shocking, thrilling elements were emphasized to pull in the crowds and the posters often promised more than the films delivered. Indeed, Arkoff and Nicholson would often start with a title, design the poster and only then, if it still looked good, would they go ahead with a script. Many of Hollywood's top names, including Woody Allen, Jack Nicholson and Martin Scorsese began their careers at AIP.

Attack Of The 50 Foot Woman (1958) US 81 * 41 in. (206 x 104 cm) Art by Reynold Brown Courtesy of the Haldane Collection

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