Counter Cultural Agendas

The 'cynical' part of the argument would be its implications for the idealism of the period, the aesthetics of the films, and the politics of their makers. For if there is one theme that informs most of the essays, it is the value placed on the socially critical impact of the films, as well as the counter-cultural engagement of the directors and writers. This does not mean that the American auteurs had to belong to the left in the European sense of the term, or even liberal in the U.S. sense...

David Thomson

There was that image from the end of Deliverance (1972), of the hand coming up out of the water - the corpse that refuses to go away. One hand. Where's the other hand I wondered. Zinger It erupted from beneath the cinders on the grave of Carrie (1976), a hand to drag us down into the darkness. But perhaps you were only in elementary school in the 1970s, and thus, in a country with contradictory impulses about sheltering its young, you did not attend to what was...

Ii

Already by the 1990s, the New Hollywood period of 1967 to 1977 and its films had become a benchmark against which developments in contemporary Hollywood cinema could be measured, invoked either to confirm a continuing decline from a time of adventurous commercial cinema or to constitute the most appropriate analogy for any current instances of adventurous American cinema. An example of the latter position is apparent in Quentin Tarantino's 1991 linking of the two periods I think right now is...

Iii

Any description of the film-cultural world that came after the New Hollywood period discussed in this book can easily become a lament for a lapsed mode of being in the world with cinema a time of movie-going before the predominance of malls and multiplexes, before brands and franchises, synergies, high concept and film as 'event,' a time when the act of going to see a film at a central city movie palace or a double-feature at a suburban cinema was the main event. The nostalgia (overt or...

Iv

In apparent deference to the notion of a New Hollywood cinema, post 1970s American film sometimes is described as New New Hollywood. The phrase was used as early as 1978 by David Colker and Jack Virrell in their article on The New New Hollywood, in the Canadian journal, Take One.62 In order to set the ground for their series of interviews with Badham, Kagan, Kleiser, Landis, Weill and Zemeckis Gale, they said that Coppola might as well be George Cukor, or Otto Preminger, for that matter. The...

New Hollywood Cinema in the s

Edited by Thomas Elsaesser, Alexander Horwath and Noel King Front and back cover illustration Faye Dunaway in Bonnie and Clyde (1967, Arthur Penn) Cover design Kok Korpershoek, Amsterdam Lay-out japes, Amsterdam isbn 90 5356 493 4 (hardcover) isbn 90 5356 631 7 (paperback) nur 674 Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, 2004 All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this book may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or...

New Hollywood Home of Flexible Pathologies

This more dystopian conclusion offers itself from a reading of Drehli Robnik's reinterpretation of the counter-cultural war films from the 1970s, such as M*A*S*H, Kelly's Heroes and The Dirty Dozen. Such films take a high level of systemic breakdown for granted, apparently in order to draw from dysfunctionality new energies of ad-hoc alliance and informal 'teamworking', needed for unconventional tasks or missions. It would demonstrate the push-pull model (the mutual dependence of antagonistic...

In Praise of Pilot Fish

There is, however, another way of looking at the changes in the modes of production that took place around the mid-1970s, which modifies somewhat the oppositions just sketched. Taking a broader view, one can think of the classical Hollywood studio system with its vertical integration as following the Fordist principles of industrial production, centred on a fixed production site, an in-house division of labour (the assembly-line) and producer-units. In such an environment, the product's outlets...

Crossover Auteurism

The question, in relation to the present book, is whether the non-classical, romantic, European, baroque aesthetics, as well as the antagonistic, critical, and countercultural energies manifest in the first New Hollywood were a genuine, if short-lived and aborted alternative, or whether the misfits, rebels and outsiders were necessary for the 'system' to first adjust and then renew itself. This application of the push-pull model, too, may be too neat - or cynical - an opposition, but as I shall...

The Action Hero in Trouble or The Child is Father to the

So far, there is one antinomy which characterised the period that has hardly been mentioned. The 1970s were the beginnings of feminism, or rather they intensely prepared the revolutions in male-female relationships. But here, too, the oppositions may not be as stark as usually argued, when pointing an accusatory finger at the relentlessly male, if not outright 'macho' flavour of the New Hollywood, both in the films, and among the community that made them.24 The contributions in the last part of...

The Corman Connection

The historical crux here is the one brought out by several contributors of the present volume who highlight the role of Corman in the story of the New Hollywood. The Corman legend and legacy, discussed in detail by McDonagh (and touched on by King and Horwath) fits the Godfather paradigm, but nonetheless opens up another genealogy. In plotting for the reader the convoluted undergrowth of 'exploitation' filmmaking, with its mixture of grind-house, sweatshop and the various archipelagos of...

The Impure Cinema New Hollywood

So you have stumbled indeed, without the aid of LSD or other indole alkaloids, onto a secret richness and concealed density of dream onto a network by which X number of Americans are truly communicating whilst reserving their lies, recitations of routine, arid betrayals of spiritual poverty, for the official government delivery system maybe even onto a real alternative to the exitlessness, to the absence of surprise to life, that harrows the head of everybody American you The title of this book...

Notes

Cook, Lost Illusions American Cinema in the Shadow of Watergate and Vietnam 1970-1979 Berkeley Univ. of California Press, 2002 xvii. 2. David Thomson The Decade When Movies Mattered, originally Movieline August 1993 43, in this volume. 3. William Paul Hollywood Harakiri, Film Comment 13, 2 1977 62. 4. Richard Brautigan, A Confederate General at Big Sur New York Grove Castle, 5. Jon Lewis, review of Robert Kolker, A Cinema of Loneliness Penn, Stone, Kubrick, Scorsese, Spielberg,...

American Auteur Cinema

For many critics writing in the 1980s, when Hollywood once more began to conquer the world's screens with its blockbusters, the American cinema they loved and admired - the cinema of the great studio directors as well as that of independent-minded auteurs - had entered its terminal decline. Not only was the industry that produced these new event movies different so were the people who made them, the shoot-them-up plots that obsessed them, the special effects that enhanced them, and the money...

1

Nashville contra Jaws, or The Imagination of Disaster Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere The Uneasy Ride of Hollywood Auteurism and War-teurism Terrence Malick's War Movie 267 The Pathos of Failure American Films in the 1970s Notes on the Trapped in the Affection Image Hollywood's Post-traumatic Grim Fascination Fingers, James Toback and 1970s American Allegories of Post-Fordism in 1970s New Hollywood Countercultural Combat Films and Conspiracy Thrillers as Genre Recycling 333

The Canonical Story

In another sense, several essays emulate the films and their makers, by also refusing to smooth out the creases, or tuck in the corners, preferring double exposures, time loops and superimpositions to a tightly knit chain of cause and effect and final narrative closure. Such closure one finds, however, in what I have called the canonical story. Earlier, I suggested that for many film historians, the first New Hollywood now appears as an interesting, but otherwise intermediate episode a happy...

The Last Good Time We Ever

Remembering the New Hollywood Cinema That an aesthetically experimental socially conscious cinema d'auteur could exist simultaneously with a burgeoning and rapacious blockbuster mentality was extraordinary, but it became the defining mark of 1970s cinema. That the two could co-exist for long, however, was an illusion as ephemeral as the notion of liberal ideological consensus.1 Who the hell is talking to you like this How old is he The author is 52 and he loved the decade of the 1970s and its...

Richly Fruitful Detour In The American Cinema S March Toward Gigantism And Global Domination

In A Confederate General at Big Sur, Richard Brautigan refers to the last good time this country ever had.4 As we move into the twenty-first century, that phrase also captures the way we are invited to remember the period of New Hollywood Cinema, as a brief moment of cinematic aesthetic adventure that happened between the mid-1960s and the mid to late 1970s and then vanished. In his recent history of this period, Lost Illusions, David Cook sees the years from 1969 to 1975 as an aberration...