Introduction

The half century or so of Alfred Hitchcock's career spanned crucial eras in the history of world and, especially, Hollywood cinema from the refinement of the silents' ability to tell feature-length stories with images in the years before the coming of sound to the reconfiguring of film style necessitated by the conversion to talking pictures a few years later to the refinements, both narrative and visual, made in the so-called Classic Hollywood text during the 1930s and 40s to the advent in the...

And After

Because of theoretical developments on the critical scene, now is a particularly propitious time for recognizing and analyzing the breadth of Hitchcock's influence, particularly the connection between his films and those of other directors. Different ways of usefully understanding and anatomizing the kinds of connections that may obtain between texts have been taken up within cinema studies in recent years, as the theoretical work of Mikhail Bakhtin, Julia Kristeva, Harold Bloom, G rard...

For Ever Hitchcock

Much of the talk leading up to, and following, the release of Gus Van Sant's 1998 remake of the Alfred Hitchcock film Psycho 1960 was an expression of outrage and confusion at the defilement of a beloved classic. For fans and critics alike for re-viewers the Psycho remake was nothing more than a blatant rip-off not only an attempt to exploit the original film's legendary status, but worse a cheap replica of one of the best and best known of American films Psycho Saving a Classic . These viewers...

Adam Knee

The Return of Dracula 1958 is hardly a distinguished film as American horror films go a low-budget production at a time of a low ebb in the genre, horror having been largely supplanted by science fiction throughout the 1950s. Both in fact remained largely disreputable genres during the decade, rarely commanding A treatment and instead serving as fodder for drive-in double bills. The seventy-seven-minute film mentioned here, produced by the small independent company Gramercy Pictures, was itself...

Lesley Brill

Acherontia Styx Plush

Although by 1991 Alfred Hitchcock's last film was fifteen years past, his name was still synonymous with suspense, with movie and TV narratives of offbeat crime and terror. When an expensively produced crime-horror picture with marquee stars, a serial murderer, a generous dash of incongruous flippancy, and a strong psychoanalytic bent came out that year, one would have expected Hitchcock's name to be widely invoked. In reviews and numerous commentaries on The Silence of the Lambs, however, such...