Rehearsal

The way I rehearse is, I enter the room, the director's there, and I stand up and just start reading what I wrote, just like that. It's usually kind of not happening at that moment. It feels stilted. I change the words as I talk in rehearsal. Then I start moving around, writing down the changes. The director will remember the stuff that you came up with.

The script is just an outline with the main points. Sometimes I go off to a whole other thing that I'm reminded of, and then that new thing becomes part of the play. My workshop process is where I actually write it.

A play is not complete until I have the workshop audience. They tell me what is and isn't working. They are my scene partners. I never feel alone on the stage except for the first ten seconds. It's at that point that I look out and see what I call "my anchors." I find two anchors out in the audience, two people who are just waiting and ready. I start offjust telling those

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two people my story. Then I open it up to the whole audience. My intention is, "Let me tell you something." Pretty soon, the whole stage gets crowded with all my characters. I don't feel alone anymore. All of their reactions make you feel good, goose you.

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